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Territory Talk, Friday 21 April

Ahead of releasing her maiden budget for the Territory, Treasurer Nicole Manison talks with Peter Butler about the challenges and responds to questions about increasing the GST and suspending or refocusing funding on some election promises.

Territory Talk, Friday 21 April

Morning host Peter Butler reflects with Luke Gosling, Federal Member for Solomon about the coalition’s City Deals announcement for Launceston and calls for similar funding for Darwin and Palmerston.  Also discussed the abolishment of 457 Skilled Migration Visas and proposed changes to eligibility and application process to become an Australian citizen and, what are Australian values.

Territory Talk, Friday 21 April

Senator Nigel Scullion talks with Morning host Peter Butler about the abolishment of 457 Skilled Migration Visas and proposed changes to eligibility and application process to become an Australian citizen.

Territory Talk, Thursday 13 April

Do plants possess ESP?

A study led by The University of Western Australia has found plants have far more complex and developed senses than we thought with the ability to detect and respond to sounds to find water, and ultimately survive.

 Morning host Peter Butler talks with lead researcher Dr Monica Gagliano about the study “Tuned in: plant roots use sound to locate water” which found that plants can sense sound vibrations from running water moving through pipes or in the soil, to help their roots move towards the source of water. The study also revealed that plants do not like certain noises and will move away from particular sounds.

Territory Talk, Thursday 13 April

Dean Jamieson was murdered on 04 April 2006, leaving an irreplaceable void in the lives of those who held him dear.

Dean's mother, Josephine, has written a confronting book that is a deeply intimate and personal examination of the life and death of her child and the grief that accompanies such a loss.

In her novel titled - Last Touch - Jo critically examines the events following her son’s untimely death; the support of the social sector and the police, the role of the media and reportage and the effect on family.

Jo Jamieson was born in Scotland but now calls the Territory home and currently works as a senior Child Protection Worker in remote communities working with aboriginals and their families.  She was a mother of four, until her eldest child Dean was brutally taken away from her through murder. This is her story.

A heartbreaking story from a very brave Mum who shares her story about what she and her family went through after her son was murdered.

Jo’s book Last Touch is published by Austin Macauley and available now. 

Territory Talk, Thursday 13 April

Dean Jamieson was murdered on 04 April 2006, leaving an irreplaceable void in the lives of those who held him dear.

Dean's mother, Josephine, has written a confronting book that is a deeply intimate and personal examination of the life and death of her child and the grief that accompanies such a loss.

In her novel titled - Last Touch - Jo critically examines the events following her son’s untimely death; the support of the social sector and the police, the role of the media and reportage and the effect on family.

Jo Jamieson was born in Scotland but now calls the Territory home and currently works as a senior Child Protection Worker in remote communities working with aboriginals and their families.  She was a mother of four, until her eldest child Dean was brutally taken away from her through murder. This is her story.

A heartbreaking story from a very brave Mum who shares her story about what she and her family went through after her son was murdered.

Jo’s book Last Touch is published by Austin Macauley and available now. 

Territory Talk, Monday 10 April

Peter Butler talks with Deputy Opposition Leader Lia Finocchiaro about urgent calls to widen changes to the bail amendment act and also the Territory government’s re-introduction of the Banned Drinker Register and the inherent limitations of the regsiter being an effective tool to manage problem drinkers and the wide-spread and devastating effects alcohol fuelled violence is wreaking on Territory communities.

Territory Talk, Monday 10 April

CDU Law Professor Alan Berman talks with host Peter Butler about his role working in Bill Clinton’s administration, and, quite separately, Alan’s research and worldwide work on hate speech law.

Dr Berman’s valued work in human rights and hate speech law has informed governments in Australia and globally enabling changes to contemporary legislation.

Territory Talk, Monday 10 April

Following the recapture of juvenile escapees NT Minister for Juvenile Justice Dale Wakefield explains that a review is in place and that security has been increased at the Don Dole correctional centre.

Minister Wakefield also acknowledged with Morning host Peter Butler that more needs to be done with correcting a system that has failed both inmates and the public alike.

Territory Talk, Monday 10 April

Local lad Luke Gosling has been flat-out – literally and metaphorically.

Taking a roadside breather from Pollie Pedal and his epic bike ride to help raise money and awareness for veteran support group Soldier On, Luke talked with Morning host Peter Butler about the Member for Solomon’s plea to Prime Minister Malcom Turnbull to assist with funding Palmerston and Darwin through the coalition’s City Deal.

In parliament Gosling pressed Mr Turnbull “…I have taken the liberty of amending the coalition government's City Deal policy by replacing 'Townsville' with the word 'Darwin'. I like the sound of it, and I like the idea of the Commonwealth entering into a deal with the northern capital of Australia, Darwin, to improve our city, because we do need some infrastructure. That will provide jobs not only in construction but also in tourism as people come to see the magnificent tourism that we have to offer in the north”.